Verb of the Week - Reminisce

Verb of the Week - Reminisce

By Donna Ambler on 14 January 2014

We had visitors last weekend - old friends who I have known for more than half my life and who were great company for a few very relaxing days. They helped me achieve one of my New Year's resolutions - to laugh more. And what made us laugh but talking about old times. Gosh, you can tell our kids would have cringed if they hadn't been inside watching a movie! We reminisced a lot over the weekend and it felt good!

Reminisce looks and sounds a bit odd. According to the Oxford Dictionaries, reminisce was first used in the early 19th century. It's a verb my trusted Macquarie Dictionary defines as to recall past experiences. I love the way they describe reminiscing as "to indulge in reminiscence". That certainly sounds like something ladies would do in the scenes of Pride and Prejudice. In a way, all that laughter on the weekend felt a little bit indulgent when coupled with good food and great wine.

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Category: General

Verb of the Week - Thank

Verb of the Week - Thank

By Donna Ambler on 9 January 2014

I distinctly remember receiving a letter from my Nanna (now I'm showing my age!) while we were on holidays on the Sunshine Coast one year. The last line was "Isn't it sad about Elvis?", referring to his death the previous week. Looking back in the history books (ie a Google search), I realise that was back in August 1977.

Many years on, the central west NSW town of Parkes celebrates its very own Elvis Festival. I'm not an Elvis fan by any stretch of the imagination, but his death and Nanna's letter had an impact on me all those years ago. I was taken by the depth of sentiment people had shown for a pop star they didn't know.

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Category: General

Verb of the Week - Respect

By Donna Ambler on 2 January 2014

Netballer Liz Ellis is hosting a program on ABC radio this afternoon and has posed the question about respect - do young people appreciate its importance? It's fine as an older generation to bang on about the way the younger generation has no respect these days. But the key point that listeners have raised is that you need to show respect to earn it in return. That's a concept that some people in positions of authority forget - respect isn't automatic. And it begins with modelling appropriate behaviour. Yes, teachers, police and other positions in society used to be revered and held in high esteem in "the old days" - they were respected (or perhaps feared) automatically.

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Category: General

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